Re-localizing Broca

 In brain injury, language, modularity, neuroimaging

broca.jpgNature is running a nice news article on the re-localization of Broca’s language area in the brain, and has as feature about it in their latest podcast.

Pierre Paul Broca originally described patient cases in which the patient suffered speech production deficits following injury to the left frontal hemisphere. However, a revisit to Broca’s original papers (see translations here and here), combined with a modern scanning of the preserved remains of Broca’s patients, has revealed that what has been called Broca’s area in modern times does not correspond to the areas implicated by Broca in his patient descriptions and neuroanatomical descriptions.

The story is interesting, but I’m amazed that the excitement is running so high. After all, lots of papers have already dethroned Broca’s (and Wernicke’s) area in the role of language processing. Take the example of the special issue of Cognition on language. Basically, what we know about language in the brain is beyond the talk (!) about Broca and Wernicke, and especially the models they suggested. Rather, both language comprehension and production require a larger neural symphony, and with substantial internal redundancy. IOW, Broca’s area can participate in comprehension, and Wernicke can play a part in production.

Nevertheless, the Nature news article is a good read, and I always recommend the Nature podcast.

-Thomas

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